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Frank Baum W Denslow.

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Condition see all. Please provide a valid price range. He appears to Dorothy as a giant head, to the Scarecrow as a lovely lady, to the Tin Woodman as a terrible beast, and to the Cowardly Lion as a ball of fire. He agrees to help them all if they kill the Wicked Witch of the West , who rules over Winkie Country. The Guardian warns them that no one has ever managed to defeat the witch. The Wicked Witch of the West sees the travelers approaching with her one telescopic eye.

She sends a pack of wolves to tear them to pieces, but the Tin Woodman kills them with his axe.

She sends wild crows to peck their eyes out, but the Scarecrow kills them by breaking their necks. She summons a swarm of black bees to sting them, but they are killed while trying to sting the Tin Woodman while the Scarecrow's straw hides the others. She sends a dozen of her Winkie slaves to attack them, but the Cowardly Lion stands firm to repel them. Dorothy is forced to become the witch's personal slave, while the witch schemes to steal her silver shoes. The witch successfully tricks Dorothy out of one of her silver shoes. Angered, she throws a bucket of water at the witch and is shocked to see her melt away.

The Winkies rejoice at being freed from her tyranny and help restuff the Scarecrow and mend the Tin Woodman.

“The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”

They ask the Tin Woodman to become their ruler, which he agrees to do after helping Dorothy return to Kansas. Dorothy finds the witch's Golden Cap and summons the Winged Monkeys to carry her and her friends back to the Emerald City. The King of the Winged Monkeys tells how he and his band are bound by an enchantment to the cap by the sorceress Gayelette from the North, and that Dorothy may use it to summon them two more times.

When Dorothy and her friends meet the Wizard of Oz again, Toto tips over a screen in a corner of the throne room that reveals the Wizard. He sadly explains he is a humbug—an ordinary old man who, by a hot air balloon, came to Oz long ago from Omaha. He provides the Scarecrow with a head full of bran, pins, and needles "a lot of bran-new brains" , the Tin Woodman with a silk heart stuffed with sawdust, and the Cowardly Lion a potion of "courage".

Their faith in his power gives these items a focus for their desires. He decides to take Dorothy and Toto home and then go back to Omaha in his balloon. At the send-off, he appoints the Scarecrow to rule in his stead, which he agrees to do after helping Dorothy return to Kansas. Toto chases a kitten in the crowd and Dorothy goes after him, but the ropes holding the balloon break and the Wizard floats away.

Dorothy summons the Winged Monkeys and tells them to carry her and Toto home, but they explain they can't cross the desert surrounding Oz. The Soldier with the Green Whiskers informs Dorothy that Glinda, the Good Witch of the South may be able to help her return home, so the travelers begin their journey to see Glinda's castle in Quadling Country. On the way, the Lion kills a giant spider who is terrorizing the animals in a forest.

They ask him to become their king, which he agrees to do after helping Dorothy return to Kansas. Dorothy summons the Winged Monkeys a third time to fly them over a hill to Glinda's castle. Glinda greets them and reveals that Dorothy's silver shoes can take her anywhere she wishes to go. She embraces her friends, all of whom will be returned to their new kingdoms through Glinda's three uses of the Golden Cap: the Scarecrow to the Emerald City, the Tin Woodman to Winkie Country, and the Lion to the forest; after which the cap will be given to the King of the Winged Monkeys, freeing him and his band.

Dorothy takes Toto in her arms, knocks her heels together three times, and wishes to return home. Instantly, she begins whirling through the air and rolling on the grass of the Kansas prairie, up to the farmhouse. She runs to Aunt Em, saying "I'm so glad to be home again! The book was illustrated by Baum's friend and collaborator W. Denslow , who also co-held the copyright.

The design was lavish for the time, with illustrations on many pages, backgrounds in different colors, and several color plate illustrations. The editorial opined that had it not been for Denslow's pictures, the readers would be unable to picture precisely the figures of Dorothy, Toto, and the other characters. The distinctive look led to imitators at the time, most notably Eva Katherine Gibson's Zauberlinda, the Wise Witch , which mimicked both the typography and the illustration design of Oz. Denslow's illustrations were so well known that merchants of many products obtained permission to use them to promote their wares.

Costume jewelry, mechanical toys, and soap were also designed using their figures. A new edition of the book appeared in , with illustrations by Evelyn Copelman. Baum acknowledged the influence of the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen , which he was deliberately revising in his "American fairy tales" to include the wonder without the horrors. Local legend has it that Oz, also known as The Emerald City, was inspired by a prominent castle-like building in the community of Castle Park near Holland, Michigan , where Baum lived during the summer. The yellow brick road was derived from a road at that time paved by yellow bricks, located in Peekskill, New York, where Baum attended the Peekskill Military Academy.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz - #1

Baum was a frequent guest at the hotel and had written several of the Oz books there. Some critics have suggested that Baum may have been inspired by Australia , a relatively new country at the time of the book's original publication. Australia is often colloquially spelled or referred to as "Oz". Furthermore, in Ozma of Oz , Dorothy gets back to Oz as the result of a storm at sea while she and Uncle Henry are traveling by ship to Australia. Like Australia, Oz is an island continent somewhere to the west of California with inhabited regions bordering on a great desert.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz - #1

One might imagine that Baum intended Oz to be Australia, or perhaps a magical land in the center of the great Australian desert. Carroll rejected the Victorian-era ideology that children's books should be saturated with morals , instead believing that children should be allowed to be children. Building on Carroll's style of numerous images accompanying the text, Baum combined the conventional features of a fairy tale witches and wizards with the well-known things in his readers' lives scarecrows and cornfields.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is considered by some to be the first American fairy tale because of its references to clear American locations such as Kansas and Omaha. Baum agreed with authors such as Carroll that fantasy literature was important for children, along with numerous illustrations, but he also wanted to create a story that had recognizable American elements in it, such as farming and industrialization. Stories such as " Rip Van Winkle ", published in , and " The Legend of Sleepy Hollow ", published in , predate the Oz tales by several decades.

Many of the characters, props, and ideas in the novel were drawn from Baum's experiences. As a child, Baum frequently had nightmares of a scarecrow pursuing him across a field.